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October, 1

Are Deadlifts Bad for CrossFit and Strength Training?

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Bulking up is a pain game and that’s where solid weight workouts come in. According to experts, the purest form of weight-based exercise is also known as deadlift where you use your full potential and lift the weight. However, some people think that deadlifting can be a little dangerous, and rightfully so. Experts say that people generally do not use the right stance or right technique which results in some injuries due to deadlifts. Apart from this beginner who is struggling with weight and has never tried weight in their life tries deadlifts which cause muscle training and sometimes even muscle injury.

However, when it comes to cross-fit training people push their limits because they want to increase the intensity and then utilize this intensity for better performance. Within cross-fit training, you can use simple cardio-based training or weight-based training to make the overall workout, however when it comes to weight-based training, especially deadlifts, people become a little reluctant about their decisions.

Deadlifts Bad for Crossfit and Strength Training – Myth or Reality

The moment of truth that you have all been waiting for, No the deadlifts are not bad for cross fit. People like to use deadlifts in their workouts and they end up making the most out of their limited time by using weight-based exercises. Most people like the idea of an intense workout that can help them stay in shape but it is better to learn the techniques and then know how you need to get your body ready for such an intense workout.

Start with a simple warm-up exercise that will help you open up your muscles. A good warm-up session will reduce the chance of injury and prevent your body from fatigue as well.

The second and most important part is to learn about the techniques of lifting weight. A deadlift is not a small weight, you need a lot of power and understanding of your posture. While lifting, make sure your feet are shoulders apart. This will offer you the stance that will support your lifting posture. Then as you lift the weight do not lift it all the way instead, go slow and set a height that your instructor recommends.

Bottom Line

To sum it all up, exercises are never bad, it is the way you use them that makes them bad. For a beginner who has never handled weight before, it is better to not use a deadlift in their cross-fit training. However, if you are familiar with the overall technique and your aim is to work on your muscles, deadlifts can be a good option. However, consulting a professional is always helpful. When you join a gym make sure to start with some technique-based learning so you can analyze how to actually handle the weight. Most people bend their backbone which means you are not using your upper body muscle for the lift, rather you are using your back muscles. For better output ensure a good frequency of reps and sets as well as balance your weight according to the required ratio.

 

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